Photo Yardwork Tickets Become Reality

July 22, 2009

What a "photo yardwork" ticket might look like.

What a "photo yardwork" ticket might look like.

Not satisfied with automated tickets for alleged traffic violations, Scottsdale-based American Traffic Solutions is boldly expanding their big-brother repertoire to go places never gone before:  directly to your house.

Known for their unpopular red-light and speed cameras, ATS will be managing a “litter enforcement program” in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, according to WBRZ News 2, the local ABC affiliate:

“15 workers are getting training on documenting blight with photographs and in generating warning letters and hearing notices to send to property owners.”

In other words, “photo yardwork” ticketing has arrived and, like always, it’s all about the money:

Violators face possible fines of $117, plus $50 in court costs if they fail to correct the violation within 15 days of receiving a warning letter. The new system also gives city-parish workers the right to clean up an uncooperative property owner’s parcel and add the costs to the owner’s annual tax bill.

Almost a quarter of the population within Baton Rouge city limits live in poverty, according to 2007 census data. While $167 may sound steep for an automatically-generated ticket processed by a greedy, private company which received a large cash infusion from taxpayer-bailed-out Goldman Sachs, we hear that ATS might still be giving away some backpacks.

How generous. Perhaps they can be boiled and eaten.


Cameras to Track Everyone, Everywhere

September 16, 2008

“They’re Watching YOU,” that’s what the sign read a month ago in the background of a CameraFRAUD.com interview with ABC 15. Now we’re realizing just how true that statement is about to become (theNewspaper.com).

“Private companies in the US are hoping to use red light cameras and speed cameras as the basis for a nationwide surveillance network similar to one that will be active next year in the UK. Redflex and American Traffic Solutions (ATS) … are quietly shopping new motorist tracking options to prospective state and local government clients…

We are moving into areas such as homeland security on a national level and on a local level,” Redflex regional director Cherif Elsadek said. “Optical character recognition is our next roll out which will be coming out in a few months — probably about five months or so.”

ATS… in a recent proposal to operate 200 speed cameras for the Arizona state police, …explained that its ticketing cameras could be integrated into a national vehicle tracking database.

Wikipedia defines “mission creep” as “…the expansion of a project or mission beyond its original goals, often after initial successes.”

Traffic cameras, which were initially built and maintained for speed enforcement, can easily be upgraded to monitor red-light violations, tire tread depth, right-turn violations, and just about any application you can think of.

With the open admission from Redflex regarding optical character recognition upgrades, it has become blatently obvious that the foreign-owned company will stop at nothing short of becoming a full-fledged quasi-police/government agency, right in the footsteps of Blackwater.

Even more disturbing is our own state government’s complicity and treasonous actions encouraging the rampant destruction of the basics of a free society: the right of law-abiding citizens to be autonomous and anonymous, to be secure in their papers and posessions, and the right to live free from unnecessary government intervention in their day-to-day lives.

A pre-2008 Arizona license plate is shown (left), with a distinct 6-character system and embossed metal stamping. The new Arizona license plate (right) is compatible with automated character recognition systems.

The new plates are printed, not embossed, to aid with plate character capture, feature a clearer (and slightly more dark) font, while incorporating a dual-strand of holographic material down the middle. (Plate Images courtesy of AZ Plates.com)


Follow Up: Plate Recognition Technology

August 18, 2008

From AZFAMILY.com:

Phoenix police officers are patrolling streets with a new secret weapon… It’s an automated license plate reader. Cameras mounted on top of police cars are taking pictures of plates, then comparing them to a database of stolen vehicles. They can read up to 50,000 plates in only a few hours.

Phoenix PD is vague about the automated reader’s capabilities as to whether they are only using it with a stolen vehicle database, or with other “watchlists” such as expired tags, expired registrations, outstanding parking tickets, etc.

Thanks to Mike for bringing this article to our attention in the comments section.


Is plate recognition technology next in the Valley?

August 18, 2008

From The Telegraph:

The latest development in CCTV is the increased use of automatic number plate recognition systems, which read number-plates and search databases for signs that a vehicle has been used in crime.

A national automatic number plate recognition system is maintained by the Association of Chief Police Officers along motorways and main roads. Every number plate picked up by the system is stored in a database with date, time and location for two years.

With almost every intersection in the valley sporting photo radar and red light cameras, it’s feasible for those systems to be linked in the future to a database that logs every license plate read – even those not snapped for a violation. Recent information trickling out of Redflex and ATS indicates that their systems actually record video of all “violations.”

Can you imagine receiving a notice in the mail saying you drove too much last Tuesday? Or how about a kindly reminder sent to you asking you to not drive Scottsdale Road as often? Such scenarios are quite plausible under Arizona’s open embrace with the surveillence society mantra.


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