Scottsdale Secretly Tracking License Plates

January 8, 2009

Exclusive – CameraFRAUD has uncovered that American Traffic Solutions has been quietly using Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) devices to monitor and track the movements of those within the self-proclaimed “Most Livable City.”

The device in question is a “Stinger Intelligent ANPR Camera” manufactured by Appian Technology, a U.K-based company which specializes in the equipment.

ANPR technology can be used to catalog driver locations, flag “suspicious” vehicles, or immediately notify interested parties when a specific plate number is detected.

“The processor element takes imagery from the camera and runs the plate recognition processes. Neural network Talon ANPR software is used as standard…” says the brochure from Appian.

“The processor is a powerful mini computer specifically developed for military image processing applications.

The documentation continues on to tout the optional addition of an RFID-enabled unit to track license plates so-equipped.

(Download Appian Cobra ANPR brochure, PDF 1.37MB)

CameraFRAUD has extensively covered the development of these invasive devices (“Show Low to Track Drivers Like Cattle” (12/12/08); “Cameras to Track Everyone, Everywhere“(9/16/2008).

Whether or not you’ve committed a traffic violation, this camera automatically presumes your guilt, tracking your license plate number, date, time, and location, with possible automated cross-checks with national terrorism databases.

It’s unknown whether the politicians as well as those in charge of the city’s photo enforcement program are aware of the deployment of the far-reaching and Orwellian technology, or if the utilization of such a device is even authorized by the contract.

If not, ATS would be in the awkward position of explaining why their technology is going far above and beyond what was requested by the city.


New DPS Scam Cam Locations Mapped

October 14, 2008

DPS has released information detailing their newest freeway camera scam locations. The massive roll-out will make it impossible to travel on a freeway without being under the microscope of an in-your-face camera.

The cameras, which have the capability to constantly record information, are also capable of receiving a character recognition upgrade, allowing the system to read the number plates of all passing vehicles.

Redflex recently expressed interest in moving into “homeland security” on a “national and local level.” Crosstown-competitor American Traffic Solutions went as far as to market their technology as being capable of interfacing with a national vehicle tracking database.

No worries: Every camera going up is just one more that will have to come down.

(Map Data-entry Courtesy CameraFRAUD.com. Data source: 12 News)


Australian IT: “Privacy concerns on speed cameras”

October 3, 2008

From Australian IT:

…planned automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) system could become a mass surveillance system, taking as many as 70 million photos of cars and drivers every day across a vast network of roadside cameras.

State and federal police forces want full-frontal images of vehicles, including the driver and front passenger, that are clear enough for identification purposes and usable as evidence in court.

“All vehicles passing through a fixed or mobile ANPR camera will have the data recorded and available for interrogation,” CrimTrac told the Queensland TravelSafe inquiry into the use of ANPR for road safety.

“Existing camera applications, such as Safe-T-Cam, red light and speed cameras could be upgraded where necessary to provide constant live streaming to a central database.

“National connectivity would be achieved through secure digital networks for fixed cameras. Law enforcement agencies would also use mobile units.”

David Vaile, executive director of the University of NSW’s Cyberspace Law and Policy Centre, warned that the ANPR “could become the next Access Card”.

“As a public surveillance system that could be linked to facial recognition, this has enough technology behind it to impinge on everybody’s daily life,” Mr Vaile said.

“CrimTrac has told us there will be 5000 cameras around the country, overwhelmingly in populated areas, taking some 70 million photos every day…

“If you use the main roads, you’re likely to be snapped several times a day, and all those photos and any related data will be held by CrimTrac for up to five years.”

[…]


Drivers could have speed limited by satellite devices

September 18, 2008

From The Telegraph:

Drivers could have their speed controlled by satellite to stop them from breaking the limit following a Government trial of new technology. Cars fitted with the system would have their speed automatically monitored by satellites, which would also be programmed with the speed limits for different roads.

I don’t think it’ll fly. There’s no true money to be made in preventing a crime from happening, unless you have some sort of “pre-crime” system. I think the technology described would be more likely used to track violations as they happen and cite the drivers, not to mention the easy tie-in with toll roads.

Oh, and just like Columbus brought over rats and pidgeons, don’t be too surprised to see this system skipping across the pond to a state near you.


%d bloggers like this: