Cameras to Track Everyone, Everywhere

September 16, 2008

“They’re Watching YOU,” that’s what the sign read a month ago in the background of a CameraFRAUD.com interview with ABC 15. Now we’re realizing just how true that statement is about to become (theNewspaper.com).

“Private companies in the US are hoping to use red light cameras and speed cameras as the basis for a nationwide surveillance network similar to one that will be active next year in the UK. Redflex and American Traffic Solutions (ATS) … are quietly shopping new motorist tracking options to prospective state and local government clients…

We are moving into areas such as homeland security on a national level and on a local level,” Redflex regional director Cherif Elsadek said. “Optical character recognition is our next roll out which will be coming out in a few months — probably about five months or so.”

ATS… in a recent proposal to operate 200 speed cameras for the Arizona state police, …explained that its ticketing cameras could be integrated into a national vehicle tracking database.

Wikipedia defines “mission creep” as “…the expansion of a project or mission beyond its original goals, often after initial successes.”

Traffic cameras, which were initially built and maintained for speed enforcement, can easily be upgraded to monitor red-light violations, tire tread depth, right-turn violations, and just about any application you can think of.

With the open admission from Redflex regarding optical character recognition upgrades, it has become blatently obvious that the foreign-owned company will stop at nothing short of becoming a full-fledged quasi-police/government agency, right in the footsteps of Blackwater.

Even more disturbing is our own state government’s complicity and treasonous actions encouraging the rampant destruction of the basics of a free society: the right of law-abiding citizens to be autonomous and anonymous, to be secure in their papers and posessions, and the right to live free from unnecessary government intervention in their day-to-day lives.

A pre-2008 Arizona license plate is shown (left), with a distinct 6-character system and embossed metal stamping. The new Arizona license plate (right) is compatible with automated character recognition systems.

The new plates are printed, not embossed, to aid with plate character capture, feature a clearer (and slightly more dark) font, while incorporating a dual-strand of holographic material down the middle. (Plate Images courtesy of AZ Plates.com)


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