Photo Radar Worker Arrested for Child Porn


pornpredA man believed to be a Redflex Traffic Systems employee has been arrested in Harrison County, TX in what officials are calling a “major” child pornography case according to the Marshall News Messenger.

Christopher Everette Jacobs of Longview, TX was arrested June 3 on three counts of child pornography.

“He was kind of a computer expert,” said [Sheriff] McCool, noting he worked for the company that manages the traffic cameras for Marshall and Longview.’

The cities of Marshall and Longview, TX utilize Redflex as their automated ticketing vendor, according to the Redflex website.

In March of 2009, the Arizona Department of Public Safety testified before state officials that they considered Redflex employees to be “agents of the state,” despite the severe lack of training and Peace Officer Standards Testing which are the norm for police officers and even some security guards.

Other Redflex employees have had their fair share of serious run-ins with the law. Late last year, Roderick Ruffin was arrested in Scottsdale for “extreme DUI” while driving an automated ticketing van. A month later, Corey Fleetwood, another Redflex van driver, attacked a demonstrator in Tempe for holding a sign near his van. Despite Redflex claiming that all employees proceed though a detailed background check, Ruffin had been involved with an assault accusation before.

As to the Texas child porn arrest, the Sheriff stated that “…there could be further charges of sexual assault.”

If Jacobs is found to have been a photo radar van driver, could it be that Redflex placed him within direct contact with children through the deployment of school-zone photo radar vans? The same vans that allow drivers to seal off windows to prevent people from looking in from the outside? Was illicit content accessed though Redflex’s network or computer systems? Only time will tell as the investigation proceeds.

Also of note: In 2005, traffic cameras in China were discovered being abused by control-room employees for the purposes of voyeurism.

Computers, vans, and cameras: A predator’s tool kit?

46 Responses to Photo Radar Worker Arrested for Child Porn

  1. RPr says:

    is this who you want in a van outside your child’s school?

  2. Stacey says:

    I remember one of our other poster’s saying that these guys could be looking at your kids and your wife and could figure out where you lived with your DMV records. Hell, if they liked your nice car they could figure out where you live. Can anyone say robbery, how about home invasion.

    • BJ says:

      Add this spin: If you activate and/or install the ANPR (license plate reader) technology, the Redflex employees will know exactly when people are home or not.

      It’s a criminal’s dream…

      “Hey John,” the burglar talking to a Redflex employee via cell phone from his car. “Can you tell me what homes may have all their cars out in ZIP code 85249?”

      (John runs a SQL query on the ANPR real-time database for all active vehicles, cross-referencing other databases to connect plates to owners and their ZIP codes.)

      “Well… Here’s one possible. All of the vehicles registered to 2824 E. Indigo St. are out. One vehicle – heh… it’s a BMW… this may be a good one, dude – was just IDed on I-10 going south to Tucson 17 minutes ago, and the other – a Lexus, hmmm… – was just seen on the 60 going west 2 minutes ago.”

      (The burglar checks Google Maps on his other iPhone, and sees that it’s a nice looking neighborhood.)

      “Thanks – I’ll check it out. I’ll call you in 10 if I need another one. If it’s a go, you’ll get yours when I done…”

      With widespread Redflex technology installed everywhere on our roads, this scenario will be quite easy to replicate for inventive criminal minds.

      But hey – we’re just paranoid, tin foil hat wearing criminals, right?

      • WOW says:

        The most likeliest of scenarios.

        Idiot.

        • BJ says:

          Ok, he who knows idiots when he sees them… How is that not a possible scenario?

          Heck – governmental agencies around the world have illegally used or abused their police power. Do you really believe that Redflex or ATS or any other surveillance technology company is above reproach?

          Why WOULDN’T organized crime get their hands in the pie?

          The most likeliest scenario here is that you have arrogant and ultimately blind view of life. Hopefully enough AZ voters out there don’t think like you ’cause we’re screwed if I’m wrong…

      • Will Kay says:

        Exactly my point as well! With this kind of technology, and the research into ANPR and other technologies to “enhance” their “capabilities”, you never know who is watching you, when they are watching, or for what reason they are watching. Ther is NO way to guarantee that these employees are of the utmost integrity.

        What’s to say that they don’t have connections to organized crime rings or criminals who are looking and would pay for personal information and whereabouts? How can these companies ABSOLUTELY guarantee that any information they either have or obtain about private citizens will never fall into the wrong hands or be used in illegal or illicit ways? Car theft rings would literally KILL for the info ATS and Redflex have.

  3. “Director Vanderpool, Agent Jacobs on the line. He says your videos have arrived.”

  4. Mark S says:

    Redflex just keeps making it hole deeper and deeper. And DPS trusts these individuals with OUR information? Just think of how many photo citations could have had the information altered on them. It is not that hard to alter data in a database on the back-end.

  5. guttersn1pe says:

    Anyone can hire a bad seed. Most of the time when someone’s arrested, you don’t hear about where they worked (as it’s mostly irrelevant).

    However, if Redflex/ATS want to play law enforcement officer then their people should go through law enforcement background checks.

    Seems reasonable to me.

  6. Pro-Camera says:

    5/7/09
    A 23-year-old Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office detention officer has been arrested by Phoenix police and charged with prostitution in connection with a second wave of arrests in the Desert Divas case, said Sheriff Joe Arpaio. Jillian Lybarger was placed on administrative leave shortly after Wednesday’s arrest, Arpaio said. She was booked into the Fourth Avenue Jail and was released on her own recognizance.

    1/16/09
    A Tolleson police sergeant quit his job after Phoenix police questioned him about his involvement with what they called a prostitution ring. Sgt. Dave Matta’s address appeared in the business records of Desert Divas, a high-end escort service, 21 times, Phoenix police said.

    1/12/09
    Robert Ramirez, a 38-year-old Maricopa County Sheriff’s Detention officer, has been arrested on charges of molesting a 10-year-old female relative.

    5/1/2008
    Phoenix Police are investigating one of their own. Detective Richard Polk, a father of two, is now charged with the sexual exploitation of a minor. This came after a search of his home and computer.

    Obviously, there are bad apples even with an AZ P.O.S.T. certification, or the background checks that detention officers go through. You really can’t expect there to be no bad apples with Photo Radar employees either.

    • No, but we don’t want untrained, unchecked perverts with access to video equipment and license plate data bases who are hired by foreign companies to enforce our laws.

      Is that so difficult to understand?

      • Pro-Camera says:

        What access do you think they have? it is the same access that every one of these officers had. The MVD Database. Except the officers also have access to Criminal history as well. here is one more example for you.

        5/26/09
        (Goodyear PD Officer) Richard Beck has relinquished his badge in the wake of accusations that he illegally accessed law-enforcement databases to look up information about a man (an Avondale PD Officer) he believed was having an affair with his estranged wife, and later lied about it.

        • At least law enforcement is under direct supervision of other law enforcement. DPS has no idea what is going on in the back rooms at Redflex and ATS, and who they are hiring, and what they are doing with the information.

          • Stacey says:

            We already know a number of police officers and politicians worldwide have been caught taking kickbacks from photo radar companies.

        • BJ says:

          To add to PhotoRadarScam’s post, the power of cameras everywhere recording real-time info to a dynamic data source, vs. only a fixed database of names and addresses, is exponentially more powerful in terms of possibilities for abuse or misuse.

    • James S says:

      That’s true pro-cam, bad apples are everywhere.

      However, keep in mind there are hundreds of thousands of police officers in the US, compared to only 300 max Redflex employees.

      I think Redflex may be held to a higher standard of hiring because they make such a point to say how secure and perfect their whole process and system is.

      • Pro-Camera says:

        My examples were from the Phoenix Metro Area in the last year. There are thousands of Police arrests every year if you go nationwide.

        • James S says:

          I think the difference is we need honest peace officers. We don’t have a choice to go without them.

          We do have a choice to go without a powerful surveillance network ran by private, for-profits.

          But I see your point and respect your eloquent comments.

        • Stacey says:

          I would trust a police officer before I would ever trust a corporation or one of its employees – thank you very much.

      • Pro-Camera says:

        Also, I would expect the officers, who have no checks and balances of their actions, should be held to a higher standard than a Redflex employee. Sure, this guy was a “Computer Whiz”, but most networks have safeguards to see who is doing what in the network. I would expect that Redflex does this as well or AZ DPS would not allow them to tap in to the national database.

        • James S says:

          But that’s the catch to private companies doing the job of law enforcement: no way for you or me to audit the agency that should be responsible to the public.

          Rather, they are only responsible to the shareholders.

          Send Redflex a FOIA. They’ll laugh at you because it only applies to the government.

          • Pro-Camera says:

            The audit they have is the DPS database. To use it, there has to be an approved user logged in. They do not accept group user accounts. And every access and query is time stamped as to the user account who made the query. Now we are expecting DPS to investigate anything against Redflex, but then it goes to do you trust officers investigating a private entity?

            • How do you know they don’t accept group user accounts?

              • Pro-Camera says:

                They have yearly renewal where every user has to go through “Training” viewing a video on the proper use of the system. How do I know, ask a police officer if they have to personally log on to their in vehicle terminal.

              • Mark S says:

                Obviously this bozo is a dps or redfux employee.

            • You dodged the question. Are you a police officer? How do you know this? How do you know that the setup Redflex has isn’t different from an in-car terminal? Where I work, we log into laptop computers differently than we do desktop terminals.

              • Pro-Camera says:

                Am I a police officer? No. Look up the ACJIS (Arizona Criminal Jusice Information System) and the NCIC (National Criminal Information Center). They both are entered through the DPS network and tie in with the MVD database in all states. NCIC and ACJIS all have security protocols that require user accounts for tracking purposes and required yearly training on the system.

                Don’t believe me, fine. I don’t think I have said anything to make you doubt what I said.

              • It’s not that I don’t believe you, I just want to know how you know what you know. You still haven’t explained this. If you know because you googled it, just say so.

                • Pro-Camera says:

                  No I didn’t google it. First hand knowledge from actually having an account on the system. And no, I am not a redflex employee or a DPS employee. But I really don’t think that telling the truth shouldn’t matter where the person telling it happens to be employed.

          • Pro-Camera says:

            Also, an FOIA request would still go to AZ DPS and ask to show logs of Redflex User accounts accessing the DPS Database and what queries were made by those users and the time for each. redflex would have no say in stopping the request.

        • Stacey says:

          I would have expected American corporations like Mattel not to sell lead based toys, but hey, everybody has to make a buck, right?

    • guttersn1pe says:

      You make a good point and use some good examples. Clearly it’s not 100% effective but it does go a long way in showing an agency has at least done its due diligence before placing people in positions with this level of authority.

      I still believe law enforcement background checks should be done on people working in the law enforcement field. Redflex folks are driving marked DPS vehicles. DPS has referred to them as “agents” of their agency. They should go through a LE background check.

  7. […] +0 / -0  0 score      Photo Radar Worker Arrested for Child Porn Photo Radar Worker Arrested for Child Porn A man believed to be a Redflex Traffic Systems employee has been arrested in Harrison County, TX […]

  8. Joe says:

    Sorry, this one is too easy. Like shooting fish in a barrel.

  9. Joe says:

    Throw it back. This one is too small.

  10. Whatever says:

    If Jacobs is found to have been a photo radar van driver, could it be that Redflex placed him within direct contact with children through the deployment of school-zone photo radar vans?

    First let me address this by saying Texas only has Red Light/Speed cameras. They do not have any vans in their state.
    Second I know you all want to know how I know this so, I used to work for Redflex. I was laid off in a recent layoff of lots of workers. I am not for or against photo radar it was just a job that I did to pay the bills. Call me what you want I don’t care.

    • Walter says:

      I’ll call you honest.

      That more than I can say for a lot of other people that troll this site.

      Thank You.

    • BJ says:

      Being a former employee of Redflex, and knowing what you know (vs. us outsiders), would you vote for a proposition that banned photo enforcement in Arizona?

      • BJ says:

        And why would you vote that way? If you don’t mind answering…

        • Whatever says:

          Ummm probably not. I’m here to tell you it won’t happen. The reason I say that is most of you are right in you’re opinions on it being all about money. It is about safety too, don’t get me wrong. There are just to many in the government that are for it.
          Also the posts about the Rep who says its illegal I would challenge him on that point anyday. He needs to research a bit more.

          • BJ says:

            “There are just to many in the government that are for it.”
            *****************
            That’s been proven to be the case with the state legislature, but the proposition will take the government people out of the equation.

  11. MeanMeosh says:

    News flash – speed cameras are illegal in TX, even in school zones. There are red light scameras everywhere, but only fixed locations, no vans. This guy may be a perv, but he’s not doing any damage from a camera van, at least not in TX.

  12. ScrewedNoMatterWhat says:

    I know the guy personally and just to let you know from my understanding whatever he was doing was never tied in to his work. So blaming a company for their employees is just stupid. Besides background checks don’t tell what kind of person the individual is. I mean seriously I just read about a Juvenile detention worker arrested for sexual abuse of inmates. What about all the spousally abusive police officers, or drug abusing politicians; such as governors, mayors, congressmen and women, even presidents. Yet there is no outcry over that. Ever wonder why the war on drugs is being lost?

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